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  #11  
Old 08-07-2005, 11:04 AM
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dame carols call

This is the article referred to by meripng in which Dame Kidu makes a recommendation about the legalization of 'adult entertainment' centres.


From Post Courier 26/06/05


License brothels

Prostitution hard to control - Dame Carol

SOCIAL Development Minister Dame Carol Kidu yesterday suggested the opening up of “adult entertainment centres” to regulate prostitution in the country.
She told Parliament although she did not want the introduction of brothels in the country, it had come to a stage where Papua New Guinea needed to “face up to reality’’ as transnational sex was already in the country.
Dame Carol said “selling bodies for money on the streets’’, had become the common form of prostitution in the country.
It was illegal but that could be resolved by considering the introduction of what are known as “adult entertainment centres” — common in Queensland, Australia — a respectable term for brothels.
“I prefer not to have these centres in PNG but we must face up to reality to protect those involved in the trade as on many occasions men and women are being abused by their clients,” Dame Carol said.
“But we also have to reassess our attitudes towards prostitution as, if there are no clients, there will be no industry.”
Dame Carol’s suggestions stemmed from questions raised by Western Province Governor Dr Bob Danaya who asked what the Government had in mind to get youths off the streets.
“Is the Minister aware that at the back of some restaurants, there are illegal sexual activities going on such as massage parlours or brothels operating and what action is the ministry going to take?” Dr Danaya asked.
Dame Carol said if the adult entertainment centres were introduced, the whole industry would be regulated.
This would ensure that the industry complied with health requirements of the country.
Regulations would also be applied to ensure underaged children were not involved in the industry.
Dame Carol admitted “there are many illegal brothels in the country’’ but there was nothing much the Government could do to stop the sex trade.
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  #12  
Old 08-07-2005, 02:50 PM
mangitbay mangitbay is offline
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Question Should prostitution be legal?

Thanks for posting the article by Lady Kidu.

Question: If the issue of choice must be raised, let it be raised in the context of the men who buy the sex of prostitution. Why do men choose to buy the bodies of millions of women and children, call it sex, and seemingly get tremendous pleasure literally over their bought bodies?”

Here is a link to an article that might be of interest to some readers:

Should prostitution be legal?............http://www.unesco.org/courier/1998_1...hique/txt1.htm
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  #13  
Old 09-07-2005, 11:29 AM
Kaim_Ultange Kaim_Ultange is offline
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Arrow Tackle the real issues at hand

Let us really put some things in the spotlight.
Formulating a policy is NOT hard. Any belly polly politician can do that.

However, creating the right policies to remove unnecessary and cumbersome hurdles or impediments to stimulate development and industry growth is something that has been harder to make resulting in the social ills that this nation is facing today.

Real changes needs to be seen in the areas of:

*Taxation,
*Foreign Affairs inefficient coordinating system
*Infrastructure development (Road infrastructure, Ports, Power supplies, telecommunications network, Aviation industry, Banking Industry and the inefficient government departments)


The failures by these crucial building blocks of the nation is reflected in the growing problem of unemployment and other social ills.

Making a policy to solve the symptoms of a much deeper problem is not the best approach for any hard thinking politician.

The people of this nation must be provided with real opportunities that will allow them to use their full human potential rather than resorting to some cheap/lazy and fast means of earning income.
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Old 09-07-2005, 01:02 PM
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So very true.
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Old 09-07-2005, 02:30 PM
mangitbay mangitbay is offline
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How about the social sector of the government cirlces? The one very close to the heart of most people. We need a healthy population and mind before venturing outward........
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Old 10-07-2005, 11:44 AM
meripng meripng is offline
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Very interesting article to read:
http://action.web.ca/home/catw/attac...onyJan2004.doc
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Old 10-07-2005, 11:47 AM
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Deviating from the issue.

I guess we have deviated (excuse the pun) from the issue being debated however it certainly is worthwhile mentioning how other policies can impact on the welfare of individuals in the light of prostitution within PNG.

Making policies is a matter up to the politicians and this must be done in the light of the laws which govern the nation and peoples unalienable human rights.

One need look at the ECP debacle to see how various political wranglers can literally screw up millions in foreign aide.

Good policy, social conscience and also a realistic view (not idealistic) of the status quo is needed.

Prostitution will not go away if you simply choose to ignore it.

As I mentioned previously one needs to understand the bahavioural nexus that leads a person (male/female) to seek the services of a sex worker as well as understand the mentality behind a person who works in the sex industry (legal / illegal).

Some studies have been undertaken by the IMR and it would be interesting to see the results of these studies if one has access to them.

Once you understand the problem, its root cause and propagation; only then can you formulate policies to intervene in a meaningful way.

Right now though PNG is faced with a fairly scary situation; the spread of HIV in the heterosexual population on a background of lowered natural resistance to the virus (see recent articles in the National about the work being done by Dr. Masta).

This bodes poorly for PNGs future.

One can make a difference by targetting those at greatest risk of acquiring and transmitting the virus vis prostitutes and their clients.

If by regulation you can reduce the spread of the virus by this route you can in effect prevent the spread within the community and reduce its impact; socially as well as economically.

Good policy therefore should aim to improve the country socially and economically and one can infer that if you reduce the spread of HIV and ultimately AIDS you achieve both.
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Old 11-07-2005, 12:38 PM
mangitbay mangitbay is offline
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The question will be: How would you police this regulation? History has shown that we can't police anything in PNG!
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Old 13-07-2005, 05:50 PM
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I still think its a bad idea to legalise prostitution...
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Old 08-08-2005, 08:32 PM
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Legalising Prostitution Will Not Stop The Harm!

Prostitution is consuming thousands of girls and women and reaping enormous profits for organized crime in post-communist countries. In addition, each year, several hundred thousand women are trafficked from Eastern European countries for prostitution in sex industry centers all over the world. The practices are extremely oppressive and incompatible with universal standards of human rights. The sex trade is a form of contemporary slavery and all indications predict its growth and expansion into the 21st century.

Approximately three-fourths of the women who are recruited and trafficked are unaware that they are destined for strip clubs, brothels, or the street, where they are sold to eager male buyers. Most of the women are seeking to escape poverty, violence and lack of opportunities, but once they are under control of pimps or traffickers, they are "seasoned" into prostitution by physical and sexual violence and economic coercion. With no recourse, the women submit in the hope of eventually earning enough money to buy their way out of debt bondage or finding a way to escape. Women's compliance to multiple unwanted sexual acts results in trauma to the mind and body. Survivors of prostitution often report that each act of prostitution felt like a rape. In order to endure the multiple invasions of the body women use drugs and alcohol to numb the assaults to their dignity and bodily integrity. Eventually, the woman's physical and emotional health is destroyed.

Above all, state bodies and non-governmental organizations should understand that prostitution is a demand market created by men who buy and sell women's sexuality for their own profit and pleasure. Legal reforms should therefore create remedies that assist victims and prosecute perpetrators.

Most existing laws concerning prostitution were formulated on the assumption that prostitution is immoral activity, with women being the most immoral participants. Therefore, laws that ban prostitution usually criminalize the women. By listening to women's experiences of prostitution and moving beyond moralistic analyses, women's rights groups have defined prostitution to be sexual exploitation and a form of violence against women. All legal reforms should be based on this understanding. Therefore, states should decriminalize prostitution for women-that is, stop punishing women for being prostituted. Considering the documented harm to women who are trafficked and prostituted, it is only logical that women should not be criminalized for being the victim of those abuses. Decriminalization also means that women will not fear arrest if they seek assistance and may be more likely to testify against pimps and traffickers.

But there absolutely should be no decriminalization for pimps, traffickers, brothel owners, or the men who buy women in prostitution. All legal reforms should aim to stop these perpetrators and profiteers.

Prostitution should not be legalized. Legalization means that the state imposes regulations under which women can be prostituted. In effect, regulation means that under certain conditions it is permissible to exploit and abuse women. In several Eastern European states "tolerance zones" are being considered; in other states there are proposals for legalization. Most arguments in favor of legalization are based on trying to distinguish between "free" and "forced" prostitution and trafficking. Considering the extreme conditions of exploitation in the sex industry, those distinctions are nothing but abstractions that make for good academic debates. They are, however, meaningless to women under the control of pimps or traffickers. Certainly, the sex industry doesn't differentiate between "free" and "forced," and my research reveals that men who buy women and children in prostitution don't differentiate either. Legalization and regulation aim to redefine prostitution as a form of work, indicated by the use of the term "sex work." The renaming may clean up the image of prostitution, but it doesn't end the violence and exploitation. It only allows criminals and members of organized crime rings to become legitimate businessmen and work hand-in-hand with the state in marketing women's bodies. In the Netherlands, where two-thirds of the women in prostitution are immigrants and one-half of them are trafficked illegal immigrants, legalization has, in fact, increased prostitution and trafficking.

Prostitution is an extreme form of gender discrimination. Legalization of this violence to women restricts women's freedom and citizenship rights. If women are allowed to become a legitimate commodity, they are consigned to a second-class citizenship. Democracy is subverted.

Women's bodies and emotions must belong to them alone. They must not be traded or sold. The sex industry targets and consumes young women, usually under age 25, often girls in their teens. If a state permits prostitution to flourish, a certain portion of each generation of young women will be lost. Prostitution causes extreme harm to the body and the mind. Women who survive the beatings, rapes, sexually transmitted diseases, drugs, alcohol, and emotional abuse, emerge from prostitution ill, traumatized, and often, as poor as when they entered.

The enormity of the sex trade throughout the world is overwhelming, but the only way to proceed is to acknowledge the violence and exploitation for what it is and create remedies accordingly. Legalization will only benefit traffickers and pimps and compromise individual women and the status of women in the long run. In the words of one survivor of prostitution: "Legalization will not end abuse; it will make abuse legal."

In other words Prostitution should not be legalised, it would therefore only add more to the problems that already exist in the country.

**taken from an article by Donna M, Hughes
Author

Donna M. Hughes has been an activist in the feminist anti-sexual violence and exploitation movement since the early-1980s. She holds the Eleanor M. and Oscar M. Carlson Endowed Chair in Women's Studies, and is the Director of Women's Studies at the University of Rhode Island, USA.
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Last edited by scuba-diver; 10-08-2005 at 01:06 PM.
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