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Old 09-08-2003, 02:24 AM
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Final Notice - 5th New Guinea Biological Conference

This is a final call to those of you who have not yet sent in an abstract or completed registration form to do so by 1st August.

All abstracts MUST be submitted by or before the deadline to be organised into sessions. If we have not received an abstract from you by 1st August, you will not be presenting a talk or poster at the conference; no more extensions will be given.

We also request that all participants (even those not giving talks) please submit a registration form by 1st August so that we can organise catering for lunches and breaks. There will be a registration desk at the welcome mix on the evening of 22nd August (5:00 - 9:00 PM). Please stop by the desk to pick up your registration materials (name badge, bag, T-shirt and coffee mug).

We have received several requests for some helpful guidelines for preparing talks. Most international meetings now provide such tips, and we have attached them for those who would like to use them. There are many really useful tips here, and we encourage everyone to have a read of them.

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you soon!


The 5th BioCon Organizing Committee
Wildlife Conservation Society-PNG
P. O. Box 277, Goroka, EHP, PNG
Tel: (+675) 732-3836
Fax: (+675) 732-24

Email: 2003biocon@global.net.pg
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  #2  
Old 09-08-2003, 02:25 AM
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Guidelines for Oral and Poster Presentations :

We have received many requests for tips on how to prepare written and oral presentations. Most international meetings have such tips on their website, but as the Fifth New Guinea Biological Conference doesn’t have a website, we are sending this document to all registered presenters.

We hope you find it useful.

The following ideas are not rules that must be followed; they are intended to provide general guidelines for planning and carrying out an effective oral or poster presentation. They are a hybrid drawn from many sources, including the Society for Conservation Biology, American Ornithologists Union, American Society of Mammalogists, and even some of our own ideas!

The best talks and posters are those in which the introduction clearly establishes "what and why" issues, the transitions between slides or poster panels are smooth and logical, and the conclusions return to the ideas presented in the introduction. 12 minutes doesn’t seem long for a presentation, and you probably have lots to say, but remember that cramming too much information into a presentation is always a mistake.

(Please note: PowerPoint presentations should be in PC format on a CD. CDs and slides transparencies should be given to the session moderator the day before your presentation. We will stick to the session times regardless of any technical problems you have, so make sure your presentation runs on the computer before you stand up to talk.)
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Old 09-08-2003, 02:27 AM
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ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Planning your Talk

1. Giving a talk is very different from writing a manuscript or report. Manuscripts often have long sentences that are too hard to follow during an oral presentation; keep your sentences short.

2. Although it is acceptable to have notes during your talk, do not read from notes like you are reading a manuscript. Practice, practice, and practice some more so you do not need to read from notes.

3. During a 12-minute talk, every word has to be carefully chosen.

Thus, good organisation is critical. A common mistake is spending too much time on introduction and methods, with little time left for results and conclusions. In a short talk, do not spend more than 2-3 minutes on your introduction and methods.

4. Many experienced presenters claim that people can only remember three main points from a talk. What are your main points? Emphasise these points!

5. The three main elements of a talk are the Introduction (and Methods), body of talk (Results and Discussion) and Conclusion. Many people use these elements according to the following rule: Tell them what you're going to tell them, tell them, then tell them what you told them.

6. With good visual aids (see next section), you should be able to talk mostly from slides without much reference to notes. In preparing your presentation, talk about the slide to yourself while it is on your computer screen. If you get stuck or something doesn't sound right, modify the slide to make it clearer. Practice your talk so that the closing statements about one slide directly lead into the next one.

7. Practice and time your talk several times in front of a critical audience (e.g. your colleagues, classmates, etc). Get them to take notes on the parts that need improving. Remake slides that are confusing; if you're not sure, they need to be redone! Be sure to finish within the time limit (getting cut short by the session moderator at a meeting is extremely poor style – at the BioCon we will strictly enforce time limits). Be sure to leave 2 or 3 minutes for questions.
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Old 09-08-2003, 02:30 AM
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About Slides

(These guidelines apply equally to PowerPoint slides, slide transparencies and overhead transparencies)

1. Make simple slides - try to limit yourself to one idea per slide (two at the most). At a glance, your audience should know what a slide is attempting to communicate.

2. Provide a brief title for your slide. A brief title of a few words provides an immediate focus for the audience.

3. Some rules of thumb to follow are as follows:

a) 7 lines of type per slide maximum
b) 50 words per slide maximum
c) Font styles that are plain, (eg. Arial or Helvetica Fonts) and thus easier to read.
d) Font sizes: headings 36 pt, text 24 pt (no smaller than 18 pt) with at least double spacing between lines.
e) Use contrasting colours for text and background
f) Use upper and lower case letters, not all upper case, because a mixture of the two styles is more readable.

4. You do not need to follow the strict rules of English in slides. In general, Do not write long full sentences – people will be trying to read and will not listen to you. Instead of “The height of megapode mounds varied between 60 cm and 120 cm” you could have the bullet point: “Mound heights 60-120 cm”

5. Do not make slides from published/report figures without modifying them. A published figure will generally not have features that make it function well as a projected figure. Have a large heading or "take home message”, one or two lines long which communicates the main content of the figure. Only include information directly related to what you are talking about.

6. Think carefully about your graphics and animation. Many slides are way too busy, with too many colours and fancy animation. Remember that people are there to hear your science, not to see how many tricks you know about making slides. Don't lose sight of the information content. Too much animation in PowerPoint, like text flying in from all directions, distracts from your message.

7. Choose the colours carefully. Project your slides in advance to see how well the colours stand out from the back of a large room. Because 10% of males are red-green colour blind, do not use reds with greens in your slides.

8. Be consistent in the style of your slides. View your entire talk as a continuous flow, not as a series of disjointed ideas. Be consistent in background colour, font style and size, use of colour, bullets, labelling of axes, use of titles and so on.

9. Have someone check your slides for misspelled words. Italicise scientific names.

10. Plan your presentation so that you have about 1 slide per minute. You can get away with more slides if they are pictures to set the scheme without much text. Having TOO many slides compromises many talks.

Spend time thoroughly explaining each slide, so that the listener is not left confused. This is especially important for graphs.

11. If you have to apologize for any slide (like it's hard to read, too dark, too much information on it, etc.) Don't show it. There is no excuse for bad slides. If you must show it, don't apologise.
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Old 09-08-2003, 02:31 AM
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Before your Talk

1. Preview your slides well in advance. Make sure slide transparencies are not upside down or backwards or that your PowerPoint is loaded and runs. If you do not do this and have problems at the start of your talk –you will not get an extension of time for such problems.

2. Visit the podium or wherever you will give your talk from to get comfortable with the podium or place you'll speak from.

a) Meet the moderator ahead of time so that he/she knows who you are. Give your slides or PowerPoint CD to the person-in-charge.
b) Learn which key advances screens on the computer, locate the pointer, slide advancer, light switches, and podium light.
c) Locate the proper position for the microphone.

3. If you know that your throat gets dry while speaking, or if you have a cold, be sure to plan ahead by bringing a cup of water or a throat lozenge.
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Old 09-08-2003, 02:32 AM
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Beginning your Talk

1. After you are introduced, very briefly thank the person who introduced you. A simple “thank you” will do.

2. If you have other acknowledgements, save them to the end and make them very brief (just mention your collaborators, and don't show pictures). Do not start your talk with a list of collaborators.

3. Begin your talk decisively. Far too often, the opening words of a talk are "Uh, well um, OK, let's see..." Be sure that the first words out of your mouth are not "well, uh, um, ok, you know," or something similarly silly. Work on not saying "uh" "um" "ok" "you know" or “em nau”.

4. It is important to capture the attention of the audience by looking at them and establishing contact with them, with the lights on.
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Old 09-08-2003, 02:34 AM
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During your Talk

1. Be confident – you did the work and you should know it better than anyone in the audience. Try and be enthusiastic and vary your tone. A level monotone makes you sound like a robot and will put your audience to sleep!

2. Do not talk to the screen or your notes. Talk to your audience. (Although it's OK to occasionally refer to your notes).

3. Do not fidget or jingle your keys or change in your pocket.

4. Do not talk too fast – this is especially true at meetings like the BioCon where most people speak English as a second language. If necessary, write notes to yourself in the margins of your notes like "slow down" or "take a deep breath." The correct speed to talk often seems very, very slow to the presenter, but just right to the audience.

5. Avoid reading the text on slides to your audience, unless you have a very important quote.

6. Make sure that what you are saying is directly related to what you have written on the slide, and is said in the same order as you have written on the slide. For example, if you have “megapode mounds 6-10 m” on the slide, you might say “megapode mounds were 6 to 10 meters in diameter, with an average of 8.4 meters”.

7. Be careful in using humour - it's great when it works, but terrible when it doesn’t.

8. It is OK to have pauses during your talk (i.e., instead of filling in time with non-important talk). Pauses are an effective way of letting your audience catch up with you and absorb your important points - they will not think you are dumb if there are short pauses, especially at key points. Remember that pauses always seem longer to the speaker than to the audience.

9. When using a laser pointer, keep it pointed on the area of interest. It's very distracting when the speaker moves the pointer all around the slide.
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Old 09-08-2003, 02:35 AM
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Ending your talk

1. End your talk decisively. Do not just stop and mutter something, leaving the audience to wonder if you are done.

2. Do not end with: "Are there any questions" -- the proper protocol calls for applause first. Rather, say something like "Thank you for your attention" or simply "Thank you"; this cues the audience to applaud.

After the applause the moderator will ask if there are any questions. Try to avoid endings like "Well, that's about all I have."

3. In handling questions, avoid combative answers. Part of the reason to present is to get feedback that might improve your work. Take constructive criticism as a positive thing.

4. Be sure to ask for clarification if you don't understand a question, and don't hesitate to say you don't have an answer if you don’t.
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Old 09-08-2003, 02:38 AM
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POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Preparing a poster is very different from preparing a talk. Although the audience has more time to absorb information from a poster than a quick slide, many people do not have the patience to spend more than a few minutes reading a poster. Poster sessions are often crowded and busy, conditions that can make close viewing difficult. Thus, it is just as critical in a poster as in an oral presentation to keep the graphics and text simple.

Posters should fit onto the poster-boards provided at the BioCon, which are 65 cm wide and 90 cm high.

1. Do not just tack a manuscript to poster-board, add a title, and expect people to read it. As with slides, extract the major points and present them in a simple, logical, and organized fashion. Your poster must have the same general elements of a published paper: A Summary or Abstract (this is all most people will read – make it large font size and central to your poster), short Introduction, short Methods, and longer Results and Discussion/Conclusions.

2. Do not design your poster thinking that you will be there to explain. A poster should stand on its own.

3. The most effective posters are those that convey the information in bullet-point format. Thus, do not simply increase the font size of your abstract and put it on a poster-board. Keep your sentences short and to the point.

4. Use large font size The goal is to make your poster easy to read; a general rule of thumb is that your poster should be able to be read from 1-2 m away. Suggested type sizes: use 84 pt font size for title, 42 pt for authors and addresses, 30 pt for section headings, 24 pt for text.

5. Mix text with nice photographs or simple graphics that illustrate your points (Remember: "A picture is worth a thousand words."). This makes for a more interesting poster, especially if the graphics are in colour.
HOWEVER, choose your colours and design your graphics carefully! The guidelines for making slides for oral presentations also apply to posters.

6. Figures and Tables: Each figure should have the following:

a) A large heading or "take home message”, one or two lines long which communicates the main content of the figure; and
b) A legend that should contain information that would normally appear in the body of a manuscript (in other words, elaboration on the take home message, statistics, etc.). Remember, a casual viewer of your poster should be able to understand the poster without having to read the figure legends; the legends are strictly for those people who want to gain more detailed information about the figures. Tables should follow the same general layout as figures. Tables should be simple and contain no extraneous material. For ease of viewing, try to convert any tables into figures.

7. It is a good idea to have a small picture of yourself in one corner of the poster. This enables people who have read your poster to find you and talk to you in the meeting.

For further information, please CLICK HERE :
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